Force 200 LED's

Hi.  The Force 200 LED's are too dim to be able to see during the day - so the installers are having a hard time seeing them when they are up a tower or in any installation where they are not able to shield ambient light.

Also, could these be designed to have the LED's on the bottom of the feed horn - so that we would be abel to see them when the 200's are on a mast above our heads?

If i were to redesign the LED placement, i would put them in the back, along with the Ethernet connector. 

F200 being a solid dish, it is difficult sometimes to watch the leds from the side, and do the alignment at the same time, from the back.

But that's just my personal opinion.

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Yea, 10-4. That's what our guys say too - MUCH brighter, and on the back. The bottom side of the feed horn would be better than where they are now, but you are correct - the back would be best.  In short - bright enough to be visible, and located where the installer can see them.  :)

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And then add the radome and the LEDs go away completely.

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""And then add the radome and the LEDs go away completely.""



I think that would be perfect. the less unnecessary blinking lights, the better.

IMO the lights are good for

*Seeing if it's powered

*Showing eth link or not

*show scanning vs association

If you could actually see them, even though it would be difficult from the front, it would be extremely handy to have.


@jluthman wrote:

IMO the lights are good for

*Seeing if it's powered

*Showing eth link or not

*show scanning vs association

If you could actually see them, even though it would be difficult from the front, it would be extremely handy to have.


Yup - exactly. IF you can actually see them. :) Last week we had a situation where the installer was 3 KM perfect LOS, and wasn't registering.  We asked him ''are you sure it's powered up?" and he said "I can't tell".  He had his hands cupped over the feedhorn - his head laying on the reflector to get his eye to his hands - and still couldn't see if it was powered up.

It turned out to be a mistyped encryption key - but the point is, he could even see if the light were ON, let alone use them to do any real work.  

use a beeper like the wimax but simpler.     one very slow pulse for searching,   1 beep intween for 1 light, 2 quick beeps for the same as 2 lights, 3 quick beeps for 3 lights. and maybe a 4th for max modulation...... makes getting a start much easier, not to mention for times when you cant see the lights at all.    both for future intergrated and dished products.